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Black-throat Blue Warbler Stakeout

Posted on January 10th, 2017 in Oregon, Outdoor Adventures in Portland.

One block from Fulton House Bed and Breakfast is a stakeout for a sighting of the Black-throat Blue Warbler!

http://ebird.ca/sightings.jsp?country=US&back=21&prov=OR

Click on link for map and info.


TRAVEL OREGON

Posted on September 7th, 2016 in Oregon, Outdoor Adventures in Portland.

Columbia River Gorge

Columbia River Gorge

Check out travel Oregon when planning your next trip to Portland and surroundings.


Oregon state lodging tax increase takes effect July 1, 2016!

Posted on April 21st, 2016 in Events at the B & B, Oregon.

An explanation of this state-wide increase affecting all lodging establishments:

The Portland Tribune, March 3, 2016

SALEM — Oregon lawmakers passed a bill Thursday to nearly double the statewide tourist lodging tax and open up new ways to spend the revenue.

The bill hikes the tax from 1 percent to 1.8 percent until the end of June 2020, then reduces it to 1.5 percent in July 2021.

The votes to pass the bill in the House and Senate were among the last actions lawmakers took before they adjourned on Thursday. The bill will head next to Gov. Kate Brown for her signature.

The legislation clears the way for the state to subsidize a world track championship in Eugene in 2021. Nike and University of Oregon officials have pushed for the state to help pay for the event since at least 2014 and according to news reports, the Eugene nonprofit TrackTown USA wants the state to provide $25 million for the event.

State law requires the government to spend at least 80 percent of lodging tax revenues on tourism marketing. House Bill 4146 allows the state to spend that money on any “tourism programs,” including to subsidize the costs of events such as the track championship.

State lodging tax filing requirements

If you collect payment from lodging customers, you’re responsible for collecting the tax. The tax rate is based on the date of payment:

Payment date
Tax rate
Before July 1, 2016 1%
On or after July 1, 2016 1.8%
On or after July 1, 2020 1.5%

April is Hood River Valley Blossom Time!

Posted on March 1st, 2016 in Festivals in Portland, Oregon, Outdoor Adventures in Portland, Wine Country.

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Hood River Valley Blossom Time!

Hood River Valley Blossom Time

Date: April 2016

Starting in early April, the cherry, apple and pear trees in the Hood River valley welcome spring’s return by releasing vibrant pink and white flowers. They start in the lower elevations and, like a domino effect, move up the valley creating a patchwork of color.

The area celebrates spring with the annual Hood River Valley Blossom Time, which takes place throughout April. Visit Hood River in April and enjoy family-friendly farm events, craft shows, culinary treats, wine and cider tasting, and the Hood River County Hard- Pressed Cider Fest.

One of the best ways to enjoy Blossom Time is to drive the Hood River County Fruit Loop, a gorgeous 35-mile drive that follows the county’s Scenic Tour Route and passes the valley’s plethora of orchards, wineries and farms.

Stop along the way to pick up baked goods, preserves, yarn, fresh produce, wine, cider and more. Download The Blossom Time event guide at hoodriver.org — you’ll see there’s something for everyone.

Here are a few of the 2016 Blossom Time events:

Hood River Hard-Pressed Cider Fest

Saturday, April 16, 2016

Now in its third year, the Hood River Hard-Pressed Cider Fest gives seasoned and novice cider drinkers alike the chance to sample cider from Hood River County’s very own cider makers, as well as a variety of additional Northwest cideries. More than 20 cideries participate, with more than 38 ciders on tap. The daylong event also features local food trucks, a kids area and a line-up of local music, from bluegrass to classic rock – guaranteeing a great time for the whole family.

Passport Gorge Grapes Weekend

Explore the essence of what makes the Columbia Gorge Wine Region “a world of wine in 40 miles.” With so much diversity of climate and soil, the Gorge has the ability to grow many unique varietals, from the familiar to the obscure. Purchase a Passport and use it throughout the month of April to take advantage of exclusive offers, incredible discounts and unique experiences at 24 Gorge wineries. Your passport will also allow you to access three very special, wine-focused weekend events at participating wineries.

Gorge Artists Open Studios

Now in its tenth year, Gorge Artists Open Studios Tour provides opportunities for the public to experience and enjoy art in the Columbia River Gorge. The tour is free and self-guided. Detailed maps are available online and at the Hood River County Chamber of Commerce Visitor Center. The artist roster for 2016 features a variety of work including painting, drawing, jewelry, glass, sculpture photography, textiles, fiber. Artists’ studios are located throughout the mid-Columbia from Cascade Locks to The Dalles and from Parkdale, Oregon to Trout Lake, Washington. April 22-24, 2016 gorgeartists.org

Hood River County Fair Blossom Craft Show

Hood River Fairgrounds, 3020 WyEast Rd., Hood River

This annual craft show and plant sale at the Hood River Fairgrounds includes more than 125 vendors selling jewelry, plants, clothing, baked goods, photos, paintings, metal art, garden art, and wine tastings. The annual quilt show includes more than 100 beautiful quilts. With lots more to see and do, you won’t want to miss this annual celebration of local art and craft.

 

 


Check out the Holiday Events in and around Portland!

Posted on November 18th, 2015 in Festivals in Portland, Food & Recipes, Oregon, Portland, Wine Country.

TRAVEL OREGON


Octoberfest!

Posted on September 1st, 2015 in Events at the B & B, Food & Recipes, Oregon, Things we do!, Uncategorized.

Request promotional code OCTOBERFEST and join us during October and November to celebrate the craft beer capital of the U.S., PORTLAND!

Stay with us for 2 week nights either month and we will send you to The Fulton Pub with a card for a flight of beer to sample and enjoy.

Fulton Pub has had a long history in the John’s Landing neighborhood and is a perfect starting point for your journey!

Fulton Pub Brew Menu locinfo_fulton


Rain or Shine, Portland Offers Plenty of Opportunities to Get Wet!

Posted on June 18th, 2014 in Oregon, Outdoor Adventures in Portland, Portland, Self-guided Tours of Portland Oregon, Uncategorized.

 

oswald

Oregon Coast by Michael Tillotson

Summer time in Portland really can’t be beat.  For a few short months the infamous rain showers (usually) take a vacation, letting the sun shine hot and bright and opening up a whole new set of opportunities for Portlanders to get wet! This city is surrounded in every direction by beautiful water features — endlessly flowing rivers and waterfalls, serene lakes and even the ocean are all easily accessible to the city and they are just waiting to be enjoyed. While the shopping, dining and drinking in Portland shouldn’t be overlooked, make sure you set aside some time in your visit to enjoy some of the natural places that make the Pacific Northwest such a wonderful place to be!

 With the official start of summer just days away, here are a few ideas of water-focused excursions that are sure to cool you off on a hot summer day in and around the Rose City.

Ocean

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Ecola State Park photo by Carrie Lipps

The drive to the Pacific Ocean is only one and a half hours from Portland, making a day on the beach an easy trip from the Fulton House.   Cannon Beach is a popular tourist destination where you can find easily accessible beaches and lots of shops and restaurants. Haystack rock is Cannon Beach’s iconic monolith, (giant rock) that harbors tide pools teeming with sea life. This is a popular spot so if crowds aren’t your cup of tea, you might opt to head either north or south to a few other less crowded beach destinations.

Ecola State Park lies just north of Cannon Beach off highway 101. The views of the coast from this park are breathtaking and always changing so a trip up here never gets old. There are several trails to take within the park that lead to secluded beaches and scenic viewpoints. The beaches are ideal for walking, with compacted sand, tons of rocks, shells, driftwood, tide pools, sea creatures and sea birds to discover –You may even spot a bald eagle or even a whales from one of the lookouts. Although the water stays pretty cold year round, many people find its briskness refreshing on a hot summer day! There are several picnic areas with barbecues, as well as restrooms available for day use. And if you feel like you just can’t go all the way to the coast without seeing the landmark Haystack Rock, you’re in luck! Because the view of Haystack and “the needles” from Ecola State really Park can’t be beat.

Just 10 miles south of Cannon Beach on highway 101 lies a hidden gem of a beach: Oswald West State Park. A short hike through lush rainforest leads you to half-moon shaped Short Sands Beach- a secluded spot where locals come to surf, windsurf, boogie board and swim in the ocean (most people choose to don wetsuits, it’s cold!) Oswald West State Park encompasses 2,474 acres with majestic views of Cape Falcon, Neahkahnie Mountain, Arch Cape and Smuggler’s Cove, so you can choose to head straight for the beach or pick a trail, each provides breathtaking coastal views.

 Lakes

lost lake

Lost Lake by Mike Prine

If you’re up for a bit of an adventure and you don’t mind the drive, point the car towards Mt. Hood and head up to Lost Lake. Sitting 3,100 feet up on the slopes of Mt. Hood, Lost Lake is an ideal introduction to the Oregon outdoors. There’s an easy loop hike that takes you through ancient forests and wetlands and lots of places to dip your feet in to the 175 feet of icy blue (average water temperatures in the summer are around 65 degrees). Rowboats and canoes can be rented at the lodge and there are several excellent swimming spots along the lakeshore. The view of Mt. Hood’s northwest face is perhaps the crowning glory of this spot. You don’t want to miss it.

If you’re looking for a place to catch some fish, head out the Columbia Gorge to Benson Lake. The lake is stocked with trout, largemouth bass, crappie, sunfish and bullhead and has good bank access.  There is no boat ramp but fishers are encouraged to float in tubes and rafts. Take I-84 E to exit 30 just before Multnomah Falls but be sure you read the Oregon Sport Fishing Regulations before you go.

Rivers

clack

Floaters on the Clackamas River, Oregon Live

FLOATING! A favorite summertime activity in Portland is to float down one of the regions many rivers. Think amusement park “Lazy River” rather than class 5 rapids. The Sandy and Clackamas rivers are ideal for summer floats, the former perhaps a little warmer than the latter. There really isn’t much that’s better than gliding merrily, merrily, merrily, merrily, gently down the stream with a cold drink and your closest friends and loved ones beside you. You can dunk in the water if you get too hot, and there are several spots along each route to stop and swim or rest on the shore if you so desire. To float the Clackamas River you will need to bring your own innertubes (which can be bought several stores in Portland. We recommend individual tubes or the double ones with an inflatable cooler in the middle), snacks and beverages and your group will need two vehicles. Drive to Carver Park and leave one vehicle in the parking lot, then take your crew and all  your gear to Barton Park and launch your rafts from there. You’ll end up floating about five miles, which usually takes about 3-4 hours with a few short stops. There are a few sections of gentle rapids, nothing scary or dangerous- just fun! A word of warning though, this section of the river is pretty popular so be prepared to join the crowd of merry floaters!

No need to venture far from the Fulton House B&B if you’re itching to get out on the water- the beautiful Willamette River is just a couple blocks from our door! You can rent kayaks or the newly popular stand up paddle boards (SUP) from Portland Kayak Company which is a short 4 block walk from the B&B, then roll your vessel another block to Willamette Park’s boat launch. From here you can paddle south towards Sellwood and check out the funky houseboats on the east side of the river or you can head north and take a loop around Ross Island. The island is uninhabited and is owned by Ross Island Sand and Gravel, which mined the area extensively from 1926-2001. You can paddle right up to the processing plant which sits on the shores of Ross Island Lagoon on the island’s east side. An occasional barge comes through, but action at the plant is pretty minimal these days. As you round the northern tip of the island, you get a pretty stellar view of Portland’s skyline and the bridges that connect the east and west sides. Boats are rented by the hour or the day at very reasonable prices and the Fulton Pub is only a block away once you get back from your trip!

For a “two rivers for the price of one” experience (actually, it’s free!) head up through North Portland to Kelley Point Park where the Willamette empties into the Columbia River. While it’s not quite as picturesque as some of the other river spots I’ve highlighted in this post, Kelly Point Park is a charming spot for an afternoon stroll or a picnic. You can choose to wander wooded trails or follow the paved paths. There’s a sandy beach by the river where you can take a dip or just walk, a big rolling lawn for picnics, games or napping, and blackberry bushes galore! Time it right and bring a few bags or Tupperware containers and you could be dining on the most delicious fresh berries you’ve ever tasted. The best part of this park is it’s so close to the city center so you don’t have to spend hours in your car to get there!

Waterfalls

ponytail

Ponytail Falls by porbital

Multnomah Falls is a ubiquitous tourist landmark and it’s a sight to see for sure. Multnomah Falls is Oregon’s tallest waterfall and if you’re going to make a trip into the gorge you really have to stop and visit. You can simply view the falls from the bottom or you can hike the 2.6 miles (roundtrip) to the top and back. If you’re quick you can do it in a bout 90 minutes. It’s a lovely hike with several side trails you can take to other equally stunning waterfalls, but be prepared for crowds.

A little further east from Multnomah Falls off the Historic Columbia River Highway is another great spot for a waterfall tour. Start by following the Horsetail Falls Trail, pass through a chamber behind Ponytail Falls, and then continue on Oneonta Gorge Trail to see Oneonta Gorge, Oneonta Falls and Triple Falls. You won’t get to swim here but you can enjoy the refreshing mists and the shade that the gorge provides. This is also a popular area, so be prepared to share the trail with others.

kayakpodx

Kayaking on the Willamette travelportland.com

If you’re lucky enough to miss out on that one kind of water Portland is (in)famous for (you know, the kind that comes from the sky), make sure you check out some of the other fabulous water features this amazing region provides. Be safe and have fun, the opportunities abound!


Ecotours of Oregon

Posted on June 16th, 2014 in History of Portland, Oregon, Portland, Self-guided Tours of Portland Oregon, Wine Country.

Sightseeing and Nature Day Tours of Oregon and SW Washington for individuals, small groups and conventions.  Tours include door-to-door transportation from the Portland Oregon USA metro area. Here is an example of their great tours:

Eco Tours of Oregon Columbia River Gorge Waterfalls/Mount Hood “Loop” Tour

The Columbia River Gorge Waterfalls Tour is usually combined with a “loop” around Mount Hood, Oregon’s tallest mountain. This tour is normally scheduled from 9 AM to 5:30 PM. The following is a sample itinerary. Full day $80.00 each. Group discounts available for 30+ guests.
9:00 AM Pick up at your hotel or location. Head east to the sea-level 4000 foot deep Columbia Gorge, which cuts through the Cascade Mountains by the Columbia River.
9:35 AM Our first stop will be Chanticleer Point. Situated 700 feet above the mighty Columbia River, we’ll be able to see incredible views overlooking the Columbia River, Washington State and the Oregon side of the gorge.

Click for view of the Columbia River Gorge
9:50 AM Stop at the historic Vista House for a spectacular thirty-mile view of the river and a rest stop with interesting historic photography and native wildflower exhibits.
10:20 AM Head further east on the “Old Scenic Highway” while you learn about the history of the first mountain highway of the west. We’ll stop at several waterfalls with interesting names like Latourell, Wahkeena, Multnomah and Horsetail for short walks or longer hikes (you choose), quiet reflection and photo opportunities.
11:00 AM Guests always enjoy the visit to Multnomah Falls, Oregon’s most famous and tallest waterfall at 620 feet. EcoTours will provide plenty of time for you to enjoy the ten-minute walk up to the Benson Bridge between the lower and upper falls for views and photos, and to visit the Nature Center and Gift Shop.

Click for view of Multnomah Falls
11:30 AM Still heading east, we’ll discuss the life cycle of Pacific Northwest Salmon en route to the Bonneville Dam, where we may see migrating adult salmon through the fish-viewing windows and in the fish ladders.
12:30 PM Lunch time will be spent at Hood River, “the windsurfing capitol of the U.S.A.” We’ll drive you through downtown area and point out some of our favorite restaurants, then leave you on your own to eat and look and browse through this quaint, compact town.
1:30 PM After lunch, we’ll head through the picturesque Hood River Valley possible stopping at local fruit stands to sample locally-grown cherries, berries, pears and apples. While climbing Mount Hood’s southeast flank, you will learn about Oregon’s diverse ecosystems as the scenery changes from the dry eastside Cascades featuring ponderosa pine forests, to the lush westside forests of douglas fir, cedar and hemlock. Many guests enjoy optional stop to see a portion of the original Oregon Trail as we continue the drive to the high alpine forests of Mount Hood’s upper elevations. NOTE: If road conditions get dangerous in winter, we may not make it into the higher mountain areas. If this happens, we will take the guests up to the snow and then head back for more sightseeing in the Eastern Columbia Gorge Area. The Eastern Columbia Gorge offers great beautiful dry desert mountain views and historical areas. We may cross the Columbia River into Washington State for additional terrific photo stops. We finish the tour at about the same time if we follow the alternate winter itinerary (5:30 PM).
3:30 PM Arrive at the pinnacle of our day, Timberline Lodge, at 6000 feet. Here, you’ll be treated to incredible high alpine views of snow-capped Mount Hood and the surrounding Cascades. Guests enjoy a walk through the historic lodge and the trails with sweeping views of the Cascade Range.

Click for a view of the South side of Mt. Hood
4:00 PM On our drive back to Portland, we’ll pass through beautiful mountainous terrain and quaint small towns into the fertile agricultural fields of the Willamette Valley.
5:30 PM Arrive back at your hotel or home.
The cost of this day tour is $80.00 each. Cost includes door-to-door transportation and the interpretive naturalist services of your ecotour guide. Group discounts available for 30+ guests.Recent recommendations.It was a wonderful tour and you were great to do business with! Benjamin Cuker, Ph.D. Professor of Marine & Environmental Science American Society of Limnology and Oceanography Hampton University Hampton, VA 23668

Eco Tours of Oregon Day Tours 9025 N Allegheny Ave., Portland, OR 97203
Phone
Toll Free
Fax
503-245-1428
888-TOURS-33
Call for number

 


Fulton House Bed & Breakfast connection to Walla Walla Washington

Posted on January 17th, 2014 in History of Portland, Oregon, Portland, Self-guided Tours of Portland Oregon.

Frank Weber's Sons Tannery

Frank Weber’s Sons Tannery

The Fulton House, built in the late 19th century, originally served as a bordello floating in the Willamette River, one of the gambling houses and bordellos built in present-day Willamette Park. Around 1902, the house was placed on logs and dragged one block west up the hill to its present location, a lot owned by Joseph Weber, a local tanner who owned the entire block. The Weber Tannery was the largest tannery on the Northwest Coast in 1894 and operated until 1945.

Originally, the Fulton House was not in Portland but in the small town of Fulton, which was annexed by its larger neighbor.  One block from the Fulton House sits the old Fulton Post Office (cc 1894), today a building containing two small shops. In the area, there is a Fulton Park and the local microbrewery known as the Fulton Pub built on land previously owned by the old Fulton Dairy. Several of the larger homes in the area, like the Fulton House, still exist.

One block east of the Fulton House is Macadam Avenue, today a major thoroughfare but once the first black-topped road out of downtown Portland; in the eastern U.S., roads are paved with “macadam” not with blacktop, hence the street name (many of Portland’s early residents came from the eastern part of the country). Macadam Avenue was built to give easy access to Portland businessmen and politicians to the bars, gambling houses and bordellos, which lined the Willamette River in Willamette Park.

Having spent many years of researching the history of the Fulton House Bed & Breakfast located in Portland Oregon,  it was important to take a trip to Washington State to explore the charming historical and rural town of Walla Walla to discover the  historic connection between the two sites.

Frank I. Weber & Sons started a tannery in Walla Walla in 1871.  The factory was located between 2nd and North Palouse streets; right in the center of town.  However, his first building burned in 1879, and the building pictured above was built.  By 1896, the year this picture was taken, Weber and his sons had an extensive business dealing with leathers and shoemakers’ supplies all over the Northwest.  Having been so successful they expanded their business to Portland, Oregon in 1889 known as the Weber Brothers Tannery.

The Weber Tannery was established by Joseph & Frank I Weber and by 1916, it was the largest tannery on the North Pacific Coast, earning approximately $150,000 a year and employing more than 36 men plus multiple family members.  The Weber Tannery occupied five acres on the Willamette River bank directly across from the Riverview Cemetery.   

The tannery consisted of a 100 foot by 150 foot 3-story building, which included multiple bark ho rooms, steam drying houses, vats for storage and drying rooms, a beam ho finishing room as well as other independent buildings on the acreage including a wagon shed, a garage, multiple dwellings, fuel sheds, a moorage and a wharf (today house boats at Macadam Bay).  The facility was also located on the Oregon & California Railroad line, which allowed import of hides and supplies from Washington, Idaho, Colorado, Iowa and an occasional shipment from Canada.  Aside from tanning leather for harnesses, footwear purposes, belting etc., considerable custom work was done.  Sheep pelts, deer and fur animals skins were tanned for rugs and other purposes. 

The Weber family also owned approximately three-quarters of Block 16 between Nevada and Texas streets, as well as store front/residences on Macadam Avenue and multiple family sites on Virginia Avenue.  Today, at Nevada and Macadam, the Art Factors occupies the building, which was the Fulton Post Office, then the Fulton Hotel, a delicatessen, and a donut shop.  Just across Macadam at the foot of Nevada, was where the Fulton train station once stood.  Also along the Riverview Trolley passed on it way to the River view cemetery stop.  Nearby were the Weber’s Tannery, the Leach’s Foundry and the Irving Company Soap Works.

Be looking for our next Blog post for more about the History of the Fulton House Bed & Breakfast and its connection to Walla Walla, Washington


Walkthetown

Posted on February 10th, 2013 in Biking in Portland Oregon, Oregon, Portland, Self-guided Tours of Portland Oregon.

…………

Press Release
Look Up, Oregon!, new walking tours now ready for exploring

Summary:

Look Up, Oregon! Walking Tours of 4 Towns In The Beaver State offered FREE on Kindle from February 20-24

 

Hendersonville, North Carolina – February 12, 2013

There is no better way to see Oregon towns than on foot. And there is no better way to appreciate what you are looking at than with a self-guided walking tour from the LOOK UP, AMERICA! series. All walking tours from walkthetown.com are available for your favorite tablet or mobile device. Look Up, Oregon! includes walking tours of Astoria, Eugene, Portland (2), and Salem.
The Look Up, Oregon! walking tour ebook sells for $2.99 but can be downloaded for free from Kindle between February 20 and February 24.
A walking tour can be many things. Interested in heritage tourism? Looking for an educational day trip for the kids? Need a fun exercise plan? Want to find subjects to take great photographs? These Oregon walking tours are ready to explore when you are.
Doug Gelbert, who has authored over 400 such walking tours, describes a mix of historical, architectural, cultural and ecclesiastical Oregon landmarks. Street addresses and step-by-step directions lead the way. A quick primer on identifying architectural styles seen on Oregon streets is included.
So look twice before crossing the street and get out and look up, Oregon!